Koan, budismo zen, budismo Chan, meditación, meditation, buddhism

Gong’an and the Kanhua System of Meditation

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Chinese Philosophy and Thought, Culture, Meditation

A gōng’àn 公案 (“public case”; better known by its Japanese name, kōan) is a phrase, dialogue, or short story used in Chán 禪Buddhism to arouse doubts in the practitioner and test his understanding. In China, a Chán system of meditation was developed that based obtaining spiritual enlightenment on concentration on these phrases.

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El papel del maestro en las tradiciones de China

The Role of the Master in Chinese Tradition

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Chinese Martial Arts, Chinese Philosophy and Thought, Culture

In Chinese Martial Arts, the figure of the teacher is of vital importance, since anyone who wants to learn a martial art needs a teacher to transmit the teaching. In the West, many times the role of the teacher is misinterpreted; to understand it better, we must first examine the figure of the teacher in the religious tradition of China.

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La Impermanencia y la Idea de Cambio en la cultura y las artes marciales chinas

Impermanence and the idea of Change in Culture and Martial Arts

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Chinese Martial Arts, Chinese Philosophy and Thought

Unlike most philosophical-religious traditions of the West, which emphasize eternal life and the immutable, in China and the rest of Asia, existence was understood as a constant change, expressed by the idea of ​​impermanence. In Chinese martial arts this idea is applied by non-opposition of resistance.

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Esgrima, Artes Marciales, Caligrafía, Relación entre Caligrafía y Esgrima

The Sword and the Brush

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Chinese Calligraphy, Chinese Martial Arts, Chinese Philosophy and Thought, Culture

In Chinese culture, the concepts of Wǔ 武 and Wén 文, which represent the military and civil spheres in government, are considered opposite but complementary. At the individual level, these concepts find their best representation in two seemingly antithetical but very similar arts: swordsmanship (Dāo Fǎ 刀法) and calligraphy (Shū Fǎ 書法).

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Guan Yin y la evolución del budismo en China

Guan Yin and the Indigenization of Buddhism in China

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Chinese Philosophy and Thought, Culture, History

Within Buddhism, Guan Yin 觀音 is the Chinese name of Avalokiteshvara, the bodhisattva of compassion. His figure has undergone a unique transformation, and it is a great example of how Buddhism, a foreign religion, became so deeply rooted in people’s minds, to the point of becoming authentically Chinese.

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Budai El Buda Sonriente

Bùdài, the Laughing Buddha

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Chinese Philosophy and Thought, Culture, History

It is likely that on more than one occasion we have encountered the image of a fat, smiling and good-natured Buddha, present either in Buddhist temples, restaurants or any other Chinese establishments. This character, whom many people take for the Buddha, is actually Bùdài 布袋, a Chan 禪 monk of the 10th century whose life was somehow eccentric.

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El Yin y el Yang en Artes Marciales

The Yin-Yang Theory and its Applications to Martial Arts

Posted 6 CommentsPosted in Chinese Martial Arts, Chinese Philosophy and Thought, Culture, Qi Gong and Traditional Chinese Medicine

The Yīn-Yáng 陰陽 Theory emerged in Chinese thought from the observation of nature. This theory postulates the existence of two complementary principles that are present in all that exists. These principles were called yīn, “dark”, and yáng, “luminous”.

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